Posts tagged: pain

Spud

By , June 2, 2010 7:05 am

I walk into the cubicle, with Ken in tow.  There I find an eight-year-old boy, hoeing into a packet of chips.

“Hey, Daniel.”

“Call me Spud,” he says, without looking up.

“Hey Spud.”

With that, he raises his head, and smiles from ear to ear.

“This is my Mum,” he says, gesturing across the cubicle.

“Hi Mum.”

Spud lets out a laugh.  “She’s not your Mum!  She’s my Mum!”

I look across at Mum.  She holds her head in her hand.  “He was sick when we brought him in here, I swear.”

“Hey, I believe you.  Kids turn around quickly,” I say.

I look around at the intern, who has been taking down everything I’ve said.  He looks confused.

“Kids turn around quickly?” he parrots.  I nod.  He scribbles some more.  It’s like owning a puppy that can write.

“These are admission notes, Ken.  You don’t have to write everything.  In fact, nothing that we’ve said yet should go in the notes.”  Ken looks deflated.  I look back at Daniel.  “In fact, just put the pen down, Ken.  I don’t even know that Spud is going to need admission.”

Spud lets out another little laugh, a delighted cry.   His Mum rests her head in her hand, shaking it some more.  Ken looks at me like I’ve scolded him.  It’s like the Charades Olympics.

“It’s okay, Ken,” I repeat.  “Let’s…just…listen.”  Reluctantly, he puts the pen on the bench.

I turn back to Daniel, just as he begins to pull the auroscope off the wall.

“So you weren’t crash hot this morning, Spud.”

“Nup.”

“What was going on?”

“Sore eyes.  Stiff neck.”  He fiddles with the expensive equipment, bouncing it up and down by the cord, oily finger marks trailing all over it.

“So I heard.  The emergency doctors were worried that you might have meningitis.”

“That’s what they said, yeah.”  He tires of the auroscope, letting it go by his side.  It springs back up like a bungy, hitting the wall, before bobbing up and down on its coil.  Its tip scratches the wall, making a sound out of a B-grade horror movie.  Ken looks frightened.

“Cool,” Daniel says.

I grab the auroscope, putting it back in its holder.  “Not that cool, mate.  Six hundred bucks cool if it’s broken.”

“I don’t care.”

“Sure you will.  Once mum pawns off your iPod, X-Box, Wii and PS3 to pay for it you will.”  He looks at me and frowns, stopping dead.  “That’s right.  All of them.  So let’s just settle down a bit, okay?”

I glance around the room.  Spud gives me his complete attention, his Mum has lifted her head out of her hand, and Ken now stands motionless.  We’ve gone from Charades to Statues.  Ken gives me one more pleading look.

“You can write if you need to, Ken.”  He smiles, picking up the pen, touching it quickly to the page.

“So Spud,” I continue, “the sore eyes and the stiff neck.  What happened?”

“Gone.”

“Headache?”

“Gone.”

“Problem with light in your eyes?”

“Nup.”

“Nausea?  Vomiting?  Lethargy?  Sore joints?”

“All gone,” says Mum.  Her head returns to its rightful place.

“So they all just kind of disappeared, hey?”

“Yup.”

“And no fever at any stage?”

“No.”

I shine a torch in Daniel’s eyes.  He doesn’t blink.  I stare at the back of his eyeball with the ophthalmoscope, the non-greasy companion-piece on the wall.   His eyes stay open.  I complete a neurological exam, testing his tone, power, reflexes and sensation.  Perfect.  I check his abdominal, respiratory and cardiovascular exam. Everything is completely normal.

Ken takes notes the whole time.

“There’s one more thing I want to do Spud.  I need to raise your leg while you lie still.”

“Yeah?  You really need to do that?”  He looks genuinely excited.

“I do, yes,” I say, a little confused.

“Then watch this.”

With that, Spud takes his leg, holding it at the ankle.  He takes it in a grip that looks odd, initially.  It begins to make more sense when he takes his leg and places it over his head.

“Is that what you wanted me to do?” he asks, a little breathless.

“Well, not exactly, Spud…”

“…What, you need it to go further?”

“No!” I yell, worried about what comes next.  “No, I was not going to take your leg and put it over your head.  I just wanted to lift it up off the bed a little bit.

“Oh,” he says, disappointedly.

“Did you know he could do that?” I ask Mum.  She shakes her head some more.

“Well it’s not meningitis,” I say.

“Are you sure?” asks his Mum.

“That last test is normally called the ‘Straight Leg Raise’, or – in Spud’s case – the ‘Over the Head Raise’.  It puts a stretch on the lining around your spine, the meninges.  With meningitis, raising the leg causes a lot of pain, as it puts pressure on the meninges.   The fact that Spud can stick his leg over his ear gives me a fair indication that he doesn’t have meningitis.  In fact, it gives me a fair indication that you’re somewhat of a freak, Spud.”

The Straight Leg Raise

Spud's Leg Over the Head Raise

Spud slaps his thigh like a good ol’ boy.  I just which he had a piece of wheat between his teeth.

“So I think you’re okay, partner.  You haven’t got meningitis, and you are free to join the circus.”  He laughs again.

“So why the headache?” Mum asks

I look at Ken.  He looks at me with fear, before returning to the safety of his page.

“Don’t know,” I say shaking my head.  “Headaches come and go.  Maybe it was a first-presentation migraine.  Maybe just a bad headache.  I’m not sure.  But what I am sure is that it’s not meningitis.  I’d suggest going home and having a good rest, Spud.  And try to keep your legs in front of your head, at least for today.”

“Sure,” he says, taking my hand in a shake.

“Thank you, Doctor,” says his Mum.

“Pleasure.”  I look down at the cheeky cowboy on the bed, the one who almost tore the equipment apart, until I threatened to confiscate his electronic pacifiers.  After that, he turned into a real character.  A real little lad.

“See you Spud.  It’s been a pleasure.”  He slaps me on the back, and winks at me.

“Pleasure was all mine, doc.”

I frown, looking at his mother.  She laughs.

“Just one more question for you Daniel.  Why do they call you Spud?”

“We live on a bit of property,” Mum says, interjecting, “and Daniel has always been interested in growing things.  So we got an empty wine barrel, cut it in half, and filled it with soil.  And Daniel grows potatoes in it.”

“I love potatoes,” he says shaking the chip wrapper like a talisman.

I pause for a second.

“What were you doing this morning?”

“Tending the spuds.”

“You do it every morning?”

“Most mornings,” he says.

“Do you use fertiliser?”

“Of course, man,” he says, “Dynamic Lifter.”

“And you used that this morning?”

“Yep.”

“How much?”  He looks back at me with confusion.  “How big is the packet?”

“Well, it was pretty big, I guess.”

“It was?” asks his Mum.

“You used the whole packet?”  He looks off to the side.  It’s the first time I’ve seen him look anything but confident.  “How long after you poured the whole pack of Dynamic Lifter over your barrel did you start to get sore eyes and a headache?”  He furrows his brow some more, before grinning sheepishly.   He raises his arms in a shrug.

“At least the spuds will grow though,” he says, finally.

Mum’s head returns to her hand.  Spud laughs.  I leave. Ken continues standing there, writing something.

Valium

By , May 11, 2010 3:57 pm

“Give her some Valium,” I say.

“Really?”

“Sure.”  I look up from my page, and across at the nurse.  She looks at me blankly, shifting awkwardly from side to side.

“What for?”

“It’s a really good muscle relaxant.  Great for muscle spasms.”  Her eyes widen.  “It’s okay in a fifteen year old.”

Eric nods his head beside me in consensus.  With this, the nurse walks away to complete the order.

“Thank you, Sir Eric,” I say.

“As you wish,” he replies, without looking up.

* * * * *

Fifteen minutes later, I walk into the cubicle.  The first thing I see is the red markings on the teenage girl’s face.  There are layers of skin peeling from her forehead, down her cheeks, and off her chin.  My heart leaps, as I compute, attempting to understand why triage had neglected to let me know that this child’s face had been through a cheese grater.

A mother stands at the girl’s side, holding her hand loosely.  The girl is otherwise dressed in sporting gear, her singlet top and limbs free.  There is blood down her arms too.  The only thing left unstained is the white blanket;  a temporary bandage over gaping war wounds.

“Lauren?”

The girl smiles broadly, her glazed eyes trying to open.  The kid is stoned.  If I’d been given Valium at fifteen, I probably wouldn’t have minded my face being torn off either.  “How are you?”

“Pretty relaxed now, I think,” says her smiling mother.  She pats at her hand as only a parent can.  She turns back and looks at me, as proud as a soccer mum.

I stare back down at the record, checking that I’m in the right cubicle.  Right hospital.  Right planet.  In my world, Mum’s don’t smile when their daughter’s faces have been torn off.

I take another step closer, and Lauren grins widely.  Another bit of her face falls free.

“Is that?”  I can’t help but touch the bit that fell.

“Don’t,” warns her Mum, slapping at my wrist.  I recoil like I’m four.  “It’ll stain, and then you’ll never get it off,” she coos, her best impression of a Stepford wife.

“Right, right,” I say, rubbing absently at the back of my hand, “I get it.  What’s the name of your school house?”

“Red House.”  Lauren rubs at her face, some more war paint falling.  Literally.  It isn’t blood all over her, it’s coloured zinc cream.  “Have I still got some on me?”

“Just a little bit.  You look like you’ve been through a mincer.”

“You silly sausage!” her Mum says.  With that, she lets out a little yelp, puling her hand to her mouth, like she’s broken a self-imposed bad-joke ban.

“Is the diazepam helping?” I ask.

“I think so,” Lauren says, her falling closed, “I can’t feel the spasm anymore.”

“Can’t feel anything anymore,” whispers her Mum.  The hand returns to its rightful spot.

“So what happened?”

“Well, I was finishing the race, the fifteen hundred metres.”  Lauren stops to take a breath.  And I was coming up the straight,” she continues, her arms starting to pump, “and I felt pain down my side, all down here…”  She touches her right loin, the only part not covered in red.  “The pain just kept building, and building and building.  Until I collapsed.”

“DNF,” says her Mum.

“Right,” I say.  They both stare at me.  “Which is code for?”

“Did not finish,” says Lauren, yawning slightly.

“Bummer.”

“Yeah, bummer.  But it’s all good now.”

“I’ll bet.”  She looks at me and giggles.  “Let’s have a look at your side.”

* * * * *

I lean Lauren forward.   “Tell me where it’s sore.”

“Yeah, right there,” she says.  I notice her singlet, a synthetic thing – probably made of recycled plastic bags.

“Fancy looking singlets they get you guys in these days, aren’t they?”

“Nah, that’s not from school, that’s indoor-cricket.”

“Right.”  I look across at Mum, still smiling proudly.

“So what time did this happen?”

“About one-thirty.  Just after high jump.”

“Right.  Was that your only other event?”  Both of them laugh.  I stand back, waiting.  For the gold.

“Ummm,” says Lauren, scratching her head and grinning.  More red flakes fall.  “No, there were others.”

“Go on.”  Lauren looks at her Mum, who smiles politely.  Like it’s shrink wrapped on.

“The one hundred, the two hundred, the four hundred.”  She stops and thinks for a moment.  “The high jump, the long jump, the eight hundred.”  She looks across at her Mum.

“The discus,” she continues.  They both think for a moment more.  I expect Mum to pull out a list.

“Shot put,” Lauren says.

“And then the fifteen hundred.”

They look at me, like it’s my turn.

“Is that it?”

“Well, then this happened, she couldn’t go on.”

“No, I guess not.”  They frown with disappointment.  “I’m joking.”   Their eyes light back up.  Even Lauren’s.  “I think we know how you got the muscle strain.”

“How?” says Lauren.  I look at her, and after a couple of seconds, she laughs.

“Have you been hydrating today?”

“Yeah.  I had an apple and some chips.”

“You had an apple and chips?”  I hear the disbelief in my voice, but I can’t help myself.  “Deep fried chips or crisps.  Chips?”  She nods.  “When did you have time for chips?

“Just before high jump.”

“And then you did the fifteen hundred metres.”

“Yep.”

“Doesn’t anyone else at your school do sports?

“Yeah.”

“Are you the only one in your house, then?”

“No,” she says, laughing, “I just like sports.”

“You like sports?  Really?”  She breaks into a full Valium-giggle.  “What else do you do?”

“Cricket, and footy umpiring.”

“She wants to play football with Melbourne Uni,” says her Mum, suddenly officious, “but we’ve said she’s got to leave it to umpiring at the moment.”  I look at this slight girl, swimming around in an oversized tank top, her wiry frame falling against the bed, flakes of red peeling off.

“You want to play footy against fully grown women at university?”  She nods.  “I mean, these aren’t just fully grown women.  These are the ones who like to play football.”

“You should see the size of some of them,” says her Mum.

“I really don’t want to.  I see the size of you.  You’re fifteen.  Why would you want to play against them?”

“I like sports,” she says plainly.

All I can do is nod.


* * * * *

I walk into the office, where Eric looks up.

“This girl had a muscle strain after running the one hundred, the two hundred, the four hundred, the eight hundred, the high jump, long jump, discus and shot put.  She did it during the fifteen hundred.”

“She strained a muscle?”

“Yep.”

“Geez, that’s bad luck.  Some people are just unlucky, aren’t they?”

“It was just after she had a steak and chips.”

He stands up, looking through the window and into her cubicle.

“How big is she?”

“Fifty kilos.”

“Shot put?”

“Yeah, she was born to do it.  And she wants to play footy against Melbourne Unis women’s side.”

“Jesus!” he says, “they’ll kill her!”  He sits back down.  “I played touch-footy against a mixed team that included some of those women.”   He shakes his head with sorrow.  “They didn’t understand the concept of touch.”

I look around the office, and see the nurse heading our way.

“How’s she doing with the diazepam?” he asks.

“She’s flying,” I reply.  “I think it’s the only thing that will stop her from training tonight.

We both stand and look through the window, this mother helping her daughter with her stretches.

“Did you tell her to do that?” he asks.

“Absolutely,” I reply.  “If she ever expects to win, she’s got to get back out there and throw herself into it.  Kid’s these days, I don’t know.”

“Did she win any of the events?”

“Nup.  Best she did was a third in the shot put.”  He looks at me and frowns.  “I know, the girl who came fourth is also in the waiting room.”  He looks at me, daring that its true.  “The worst thing, though, is that this girl was winning the fifteen hundred.”

“Oh no!” he cries, “gutted!”  We sit back down, and the nurse walks past, watching Eric as we do.  I catch her, and she blushes.

Eric returns to his notes, oblivious to this interchange.  I do too.  We both write for a couple of minutes.

“How many instruments does she play?”

“Sorry?”

“How many musical instruments does she play?”

I smile.  “I haven’t asked yet,” I say, getting up, “I’ll go and find out.”

I walk out through the door.  “I’ll be back in an hour,” I yell, as it closes behind, leaving Eric and the nurse in the office alone.

* * * * *

Giving Birth

By , May 7, 2010 10:39 am

Sean turns to me, his eyes having lit up.
“Oh, you’re a doctor are you?”

“Yep.”  I exhale, my breath almost making mist.  It’s a frigid summer’s night, and we find ourselves outside, at a barbeque at dusk, drinking chilled beer.

“What’s the weirdest story you’ve been told as a doctor?”

“Oh,” I say, beginning to think.  A couple of tales – inappropriate for dinner conversation – run through my head.  I stop myself.

“The stories I hear are never as good as what I see.”

“Really?”

“Yeah.”

“Okay,” says Sean, “then try this one on then.”

I sit back, as a smirk comes to Sean’s mouth.

“So it all happened on the day of my daughter’s birth, right.”

“Oh,” Amanda says from across the table, “are you sure?  People are eating.  It’s not exactly…”

“…Perfect,” I say.  “Suddenly I’m interested.”

Sean looks at me and smiles, pleased at the approval.  “Amanda was in labour, right, and had been for a few hours.  She’s going through the contractions, they’re building…”  He pauses for effect.  “…And then it started happening.  I started getting pain myself.  You know, down there.”  He points at his pants, until I nod my understanding.

“Got it.”

“And I didn’t want to tell her, right?  You know?  I mean – guys are renowned for being pussies with pain, right?  Like they can’t hack pain, can they?”  I nod.

He leans forward, rubbing his hands together.

“So she’s starting to get more pain, the contractions are winding up, and like – almost like a sympathetic-type thing – so is my pain.  The pain in my dick is getting worse and worse.”

“And he starts acting really strange,” chimes in Amanda.  “I’m in labour, and I’m asking him to rub my back, and he’s doing it, but he’s staring into space.  Like a zombie.  He staring straight ahead, not hearing me, generally being fucking unsupportive.”

“Yeah, because I’m trying not to pass out,” he says defensively.

“Anyway,” she says.

“Anyway,” he continues, shaking his head, “so we head in to St. Vincents, and the baby’s born at 1.33pm.”

“Piece of cake,” I say.

“Yeah, piece of cake,” he repeats quickly, eager to continue, “and meantime, I’m sitting there, with my new daughter.  Just sitting there in agony.  In agony.”  I look across at Amanda.  She rolls her eyes.  “And I say, ‘Darl, I’ve got to go to hospital.’ ”

“You have to go to hospital?”

“Yep.”

“Where?”

“St Vincent’s Public.”

“So you’re in birthing suite at St V’s Private, and you walked next door to Emergency at St. V’s Public?”

“I don’t walk.  I get an ambulance.”

“Over the road.”

“Exactly.  With a kidney stone.”

“Ooh, they hurt,” I say.

“No shit!”

“No, really,” I say to Amanda, “I don’t know where I heard this, but I remember someone telling me that the two types of pain that are as intense as birth pain, are a heart attack and a kidney stone.

“No shit!” he laughs, slapping his leg, and pointing at his wife.  “I told you I was giving birth over there.  Through the eye of my dick!”


Amanda rolls her eyes again, conceding the point.

“So then what happened?” I ask.

Sean leans forward, elbows resting on his knees, like he’s ready to share game-plan tactics.

“They let me out, doped up to the eyes.”  He throws his arms up in disbelief.  “And I had to go home.”

“You didn’t go back to see your daughter?”

“Nope,” says Amanda.

“I couldn’t,” he pleads to the entire table.  “I was in agony.  I caught a cab home, and went to bed.

He takes a deep breath before continuing.

“And in the night, I woke up, busting for a piss.  I walked out to the toilet, and when I pissed…”   He shakes his head, looking away, like a digger unable to complete a story of a war atrocity.  “Eventually, I wake up, on the toilet floor, God know’s how long later.  Bleeding.”

“Bleeding?”

“From my head.  I passed out from the pain, fell against the mirror, smashed it, and cut my head.”

He sits back, like the story is finished.

“And?”

“And what?”

“Then what happened?”

He pauses for a moment, averting my eyes.  “You know,  I…well…that when I called my mum,” he says sheepishly.

The table erupts.

“Had you pulled your pants up?”

“Not sure.”

“Fair enough.  Had you cut yourself badly?”

“Nah, it was okay.  Mum fixed it.”  He takes a swig of his beer.  “Although, I swear,” he says, tapping his finger on the table, “if I’d had a knife with me as I was passing that stone, I would have cut off my dick if I knew it would stop the pain.”  He shakes his head, again taking a big swig.  “I’ll tell you, with that pain amount of pain, my dick had shrived to this big,” he says, holding his thumb and forefinger a centimetre apart, “but it felt like a metre of pain.”

He sits back again, taking a deep breath and letting it out.  He takes another drink, unconsciously rearranging his trousers.

“So when did you see your daughter again?”

“The next day, the day after we both gave birth,” he continues, without missing a beat.

Everyone sits there, staring off in their own thoughts, some people shaking their heads slightly, no one quite sure what to say.

“I think that’s the weirdest story I’ve ever been told, Sean,” I say finally, breaking the silence.

“Nah, that’s not weird, mate.  That’s just funny.”

* * * * *

Panorama Theme by Themocracy