Plaster Master

By , May 20, 2010 6:29 pm

“Zeb?” I yell into the waiting room.

I stand and wait, while fifteen heads look at me, frozen.  This is my favourite part – being stared at.  The patient you call is never within sight, they’re always round a corner, taking years to get their things together.  While everybody else stares at you.  It’s the best bit.

“Zeb?”  I call again.  This time I hear a faint shuffle, and then movement.  And then the rattle of plastic bags.  Promising.  Very promising.

One of the staring people looks away, staring at something else.  Hopefully, staring at Zeb.

And with that, from around the corner, Zeb bounds.  All perky, and…green.  Fluoro green.

“How’s it going?” he asks in an Australian drawl.

“Good mate,” I return, and he giggles delightedly.  His mother rolls her eyes, and grandma tries the same thing.  “Nice colour, Zeb.”

“Yeah.  I like green.”

“This way,” I say.  “First door on the right.”

He walks off down the corridor ahead of us, and into the plaster room.  We follow him, waiting for grandma, who eventually places herself down on a stool.  The plastic bags fall to the ground in a heap.

“Can I get a different colour this time?  Sure, I like green, but this time I want red.  Or yellow.  Or, yeah, pink maybe?  Hang on, maybe not.”  It’s difficult to tell who he’s talking to.  Possibly no one.  “Yeah pink.  Can I, can I, can I?  Huh, huh, huh?”

I look at Mum.  She looks tired, but not as tired as you might expect.  Grandma is the one who looks beat.

“I think you’ll be getting white, mate.  I don’t think we’ll be getting out the fresh colours here.”

“Oh,” he whines, “why not?”

“Because I’m only a doctor.  I only do plaster.  It’s the plaster techs who do fibreglass.  That’s where the colours come into it.”

“Yeah, right, I get it,” he starts.  “Well, there’s a plaster under here.  From the start.  From, like, when this all happened.”  He nods, and his mother and grandma do too.  “And then we went back to the GP, like – I don’t know – like two days later, and it was only up to my elbow, right?  So he, like, sent me to the Children’s Hospital, and there the guy was like, ‘Dude, I don’t think it’s quite right, but I don’t want to re-break it for like a third time…’ ”

“…Third time?” I interject.  I get that interjection is the only way with Zeb.

“When he broke it was once, and when it was straightened made a second time,” Mum manages to say.

“…And so, re-setting it would make a third time,” completes Zeb, “and he was like, ‘That would be no good, man’.  So we were all, like, ‘Yeah, cool,’ and he was like, ‘Do you like fluoro?” and I was like, ‘Uh, duh, who doesn’t like fluoro?’…”

“You like fluoro?”

“Uh, duh!” says Zeb predictably.  We, the adults, laugh.   “And then he was all, ‘You can have any fluoro you want, and we can, like, cover up the whole white mess, if you want, dude.’  And so I went all, ‘Sure.  Do you have green?’  So he’s like, ‘Yeah, we got green’, so we, like, totally got it.”

He stops.  We all take a breath.

“That is a really amazing story, Zeb.”  He nods his head vigorously.  “But why are you here?”

“Yeah right,” he says, taking a breath.  I sit down, readying myself for a story.  “I got a pen lid stuck down there.”

He stops dead.  I do a double take.

“Is that it?  No story to go with it?”

“Nah, it’s, like, pretty boring.”

“So there’s a pen lid down your cast?”

“Yep.”

“Where exactly?”  He taps at his elbow.   “So pretty much half way down.  The furthest distance from either end.”  He nods again, like it’s a bore.  “And how did it get there?”

“I was, like, scratching myself.”

“With a pen lid.”

“Well, yeah.”

“You do realise, that you’re a goose?”

“Yup.”  He looks at his mum, raising his eyes.  “I’m a goose.”  We all laugh.

“This is a good story, Zeb.  Tell me, how did it get down there?”

“What do you mean?”

“Like, dude, like, tell me how it, like, got down there?”

“Is he making fun of me?” Zeb asks mother.

“Yes, he is.”  Grandma laughs some more.

“Well,” he says, cocking his head, “I was scratching, and, it, like, came off.”

“Oh, so it was on the end of a pen?”

“Dude!  I wouldn’t just stick a pen lid down there.  It might get lost.”  We all look at him raising our eyebrows in unison.  He ignores it.

“So, anyway, it came off the end of a pen?”

“Yup.”

“So then what happened?”

“I got some chopsticks out.”  We all laugh some more.

“This is great,” I say.

“Nah, nah, nah, I was really close.  I had it up to here!”  He points to the top of the cast.  “But I didn’t have enough hands left to grab it.”

“Why didn’t you ask for help?” asks grandma.

“Because I was embarrassed,” he says quietly.  It’s the first time I’ve seen him contrite.

“Lucky you managed to avoid embarrassment, eh?”

He raises his eyebrows, knowingly.

“So what now?  Do I get a different colour?”

“Not so fast, buddy.  Firstly, we need to get the lid out, right?”  He nods.  “So we’ll have to cut it down to here, so that we can split the cast and grab it.  You think you know where it is?”

“Yeah, it’s right here,” he says, pointing.  “I can feel it.  Right here.”

“Are you ready then?”

“Yup.”

I turn and open a drawer, one dirtied by years of plaster, revealing a treasure chest of torture devices.  Splitters, cutters, shears, giant bolt cutters – a whole stack of big metal things, with smooth handles at one end, and sharp bits at the other.

“Cool!” says Zeb.

* * * * *

We start with the shears.  It chews the fibreglass ineffectively.  I get about five centimetres in, before I give up.

“This is more like a crusher than a cutter,” I say.  I feel sweat on my forehead.

“You’ve got a long way to go,” says Zeb.

“Thanks for the reminder.”

“I’m just saying’s all.”

I look him in the eye, and then put down the shears.

“I’ll be back.”

I walk next door and return, wheeling in a machine on a cart.  I plug it into the wall, and the machine revs up.  From its end emerges a snaking neck, a buzz cutter on its tip.  A circle of teeth sits on the end of a rotor, a dangerous circular saw.  Zeb’s eyes pop.

“It’s okay,” I say, “it can’t cut you.”  I turn it on, the circular blades vibrating.  I place it against my skin.  I feel its vibration.  Zeb’s mouth drops wide.  “See?  The blade zigs back and forth – it doesn’t spin right around.  So it won’t cut skin, because skin’s not fixed.  Your skin just wiggles against it.  See?”  I put it against my arm once more.

“Cool,” he says.

We start.  I work my way down, the satisfying squeal of an electric saw with each stroke.  Each time it makes it through, I check Zeb’s face.  He’s freaked out, in a boy kind of way.  He doesn’t know if he’s thrilled, or filling his pants.  Or both.

We get to near his elbow, when I ask for guidance.

“Where is it again?”

“Right here.”

“I don’t want to cut the pen lid in half, do I?”  I pause.  “In fact, why didn’t I just cut out a window at the start?”

“That’s what I thought,” says grandma.

“Me too,” says Mum.

“I wouldn’t have minded suggestions, guys,” I say.  “I guess I’m so used to taking plaster off from the top, that I didn’t even think of that.  It’s not like I go fishing for pen lids in casts every day.”  They all laugh again.  “Where is it, Zeb?”

“Right there.”

I cut a hole, 4cm by 3cm.  I peel back the plate of fibreglass, it’s final fibres cracking.  I feel like an archaeologist.  I stick my hand in and fish around, finally feeling my finger against something round.  My eyes widen.  Everyone else’s do too.  I pull, trying to free it.  And finally, out comes the lid.

“There you go,” I say.  Grandma claps.  “I didn’t know that I’d find it that easily.”

“Why not?”

“The story is just such I good one, Zeb, I guess I didn’t know what I’d find in there.”  I hand the lid to Mum.

“Can I have it?” he asks.

“I think Mum should keep it,” I say.  He rolls his eyes once more.  All this family does is laugh, raise their eyebrows and roll their eyes.  It’s like they’re all having seizures.

“So what about fixing it up?”

“This will do for now,” I say, wrapping a crepe bandage, and taping it up, “just for overnight.  “But come back to tomorrow morning when the plaster techs are in.  Then you’ll get to choose a colour.  If I did it now, you’d only get white.”

“White, like, sucks man.”

“Like, I know.”

He rolls his eyes at my poor attempt at teen speak.

“Later,” he says.

“Hopefully not,” I say.

“Right.”  He jumps off the bed.  “You’re all right, man, you know that?”

He walks out the door.

“He never says that to anyone,” whispers grandma as she passes, shuffling her plastic bags between shaky hands.  “Especially not to men.”

I nod, watching Zeb walk off ahead, his mother and grandma in tow.  I catch him, looking back occasionally, making sure he doesn’t get too far ahead of his mother or grandma.

* * * * *

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